How to Get More Out of Your Hospital Stay

A new study from the University of Connecticut finds that when hospital visits are cut short, patients are more likely to seek help and the hospital is more likely be seen by a physician.

The research found that the more people stayed in the hospital, the higher their likelihood of getting help from a physician after discharge.

Hospital stays can be particularly stressful for patients and those who need to stay in the facility for an extended period of time, particularly those with pre-existing conditions.

The researchers found that patients who stayed in a hospital longer were more likely than those who stayed for a shorter amount of time to seek medical help after discharge, and they were more than twice as likely to have a primary care physician visit.

“This study shows that it’s not just about staying longer in the community,” said study co-author Sarah Schuman, associate professor of medicine in the Department of Medicine and of Preventive Medicine at UConn.

Researchers compared data from more than 1,500 patients with preemie and newborn deaths in the U.S. over a three-year period and found that people who stayed longer in hospital were more prone to get care. “

I think a lot of us who are here to help these patients would be happy to have the staff that’s there to help us get better care.”

Researchers compared data from more than 1,500 patients with preemie and newborn deaths in the U.S. over a three-year period and found that people who stayed longer in hospital were more prone to get care.

The data showed that the majority of patients who needed medical help within 24 hours after discharge were seen by physicians.

They were also more likely on average to have primary care physicians visit.

In addition, the study found that primary care doctors tended to visit people who had a high need for care and were in need of more than two hospitalizations within 24-hours after discharge as opposed to those who had less need.

“We found that hospital stays were a significant risk factor for getting help after the patient died,” said Schuman.

“The data indicates that primary and community health care providers are much more likely in the last days of life to visit patients who need help, particularly if they have pre-emie or newborn death.”

The study also showed that those who were hospitalized more than 24 hours following the birth of their child were more inclined to seek care after the child died.

They also were more vulnerable to getting care when they were in pain or suffering from a severe illness, which makes it more difficult for them to get help.

For more information about the study, visit www.muse.edu/medcenter/publications/health/hospitals.shtml.